Depression Diagnosis

Depression is one of the most common disorder of the brain and body’s ability to biologically create and balance a normal range of thoughts, emotions, & energy. Depression can interfere with normal functioning, and frequently causes problems with work, social and family adjustment. It causes pain and suffering not only to those who have a disorder, but also to those who care about them. Some medications as well as some medical conditions can cause symptoms of depression.

Treatment choice will depend on the outcome of the evaluation. Most people do well with psychotherapy, but some require treatment with antidepressants in addition to psychotherapy. Depression is associated with school and interpersonal problems. It is also correlated with increased incidence of suicidal behavior, violent thoughts, alcohol, early pregnancy, tobacco and drug abuse. The signs and symptoms of depression often vary from one person to the next.

Depression is sometimes accompanied by a general shift in the patient’s attitude and outlook. Depression is not simply something that will go away on its own. There’s no shame associated with seeking help, and depression is not a sign of weakness or not being strong enough. Depression is one of the easier medical conditions to treat.

And unlike other conditions, the results of treatment are almost immediately visible to the depressed patient Because certain medical conditions can cause symptoms of depression, it is important to screen for physical causes. A physician can rule out these conditions through a physical examination, interview, and lab tests. If a medical cause for your depression is ruled out, a social and emotional evaluation should be done by a therapist or counselor. A good diagnostic evaluation will include a complete history of symptoms and possible causes.

Types of Depression

There are many types of depression, some are:

  • Major depression is marked by a depressed mood that lasts more than two weeks and is accompanied by several distinct symptoms associated with eating, sleeping, concentrating, etc.
  • Postpartum depression occurs in some women after childbirth.
  • Depression with psychosis is an extremely serious but uncommon condition that is characterized by delusions or hallucinations.
  • Seasonal Affective Disorder is a pattern of depression that comes and goes with the change in season.

 

Diagnosis

  • It usually takes more time to diagnose Major Depression in a child than it does to diagnose an adult.
  • The diagnostic process should include interviews of parents and the child.
  • A physician can rule out these conditions through a physical examination, interview, and lab tests.
  • Depression can also be confused with other medical illnesses. Weight loss and fatigue, for example, accompany many conditions, some serious, but they can also occur with depression.